Rx 12 A Science-Based Cartoon to Help You Search for Solutions

by Dr. SD Shanti, April 5, 2020. For translation and further details on how to use this tool, please scroll below.

  • What is Inside of You: Your thoughts, emotions, feelings, and motivations.
  • What You Do: Your actions and behaviors, including your interactions with other people.
  • The World Around You: Your environment, which includes the people around you, the culture in which you live, the physical structures of your home, aspects of your neighborhood, and the political and economic climate in which you live and work. The elements of your environment surround you in an array of concentric circles.

Use this three-part tool whenever you feel overloaded or stuck. You can also use it if you simply want to find a new way of looking at an old problem.

How to Use this Three-Part Tool

Whenever you are stuck or stressed, ask yourself these questions:

  • How can I think differently?
  • Can I view this situation from a different perspective?
  • What can I do differently?
  • Who can help me?
  • What can I change in my environment?

It might take some effort on your part to answer these questions. Allow yourself to be creative and go beyond conventional limits when seeking answers. Even if you cannot answer all of these questions, try answering one or two. The answers will give you clues for solving your problem.

Do not feel that you must use all three corners of the cartoon at once. Just begin with one corner, even if you cannot address all of them. Because the three corners are inter-connected in a two-way manner, any change you take in place can potentially have a positive impact on another corner.Remember – you always have options—and the questions above will help you find clues to solutions.

In forthcoming posts, I will share with you how people use this guide to solve situations and address challenges, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

By the way, this is my translation of science into practice, such that large numbers of people can use it in their daily lives. It is based on a landmark paper, The Self-System in Reciprocal Determinism (1978), by Professor Albert Bandura at Stanford University. And just in case you are wondering, yes he has seen it and approved it.

© Dr. SD Shanti, 2020

Rx 11 Self Efficacy: the Antidote to Hopelessness

Please scroll below for translation of this prescription and for more information about self-efficacy and the children’s story.

Even if you’re not familiar with the classic American children’s story The Little Engine That Could, which illustrates the concept of self-efficacy, the message of the book is universally relevant. Research from around the world proves the importance of self-efficacy in helping people effectively manage their lives and overcome obstacles.
If you’re interested in seeing the book and hearing the original story, here is a link on YouTube.

Translation of Prescription
Rx When you feel hopeless, say to yourself what the little engine in the children’s story said to itself over and over again, as it worked hard to reach its goal: “I think I can…I think I can…”

This illustrates a concept called self-efficacy. It is the belief that you have in your ability to do something, even when it is difficult. Repeat this to yourself and defeat hopelessness. Research shows this is the most important predictor of success. It is your antidote to hopelessness. If you think you can, it is very like that you will!